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Project Overview
Language Arts Unit 1
Language Arts Unit 2
Science Unit
Social Studies Unit 1
Social Studies Unit 2
       

Language
Arts (2)

Unit Introduction

1. Preassessment

2. Introductory Activities

3. Differentiated Activity #1

4. Large Group Instruction

5. Small group/ individual activities

6. Differentiated Activity #2

7. Final Assessment

8. Chapter Questions

 


Final Assessment  

Students will be assessed on the content by having final projects chosen from a menu.  The main dish will be required for all students. The side and dessert items will give them ample choices to select with numerous learning styles considered.  Menu’s are an appropriate Differentiated Instruction assessment for all students, as they are given several choices. It is a useful tool for learners. Students love to have options.  

The menu entices the gifted students to create, design, write, compare, research, contrast, evaluate and utilize their own talents in their final products.

The projects will be assessed by an essay and project rubric.

Novel Menu for They Cage the Animals at Night

Main Dish:                       
Select one of the following questions to write an essay. You may quote from the book, utilize page numbers and then insert your opinions.  The more specific you are, the better.

1. The theme of “caging the animals at Night” is repeatedly implied in Jennings’ autobiography.

a) Give four specific examples of this theme from the book.
b) Tell what the examples symbolize.
c) State an example of yourself being “caged at night.” How did you handle being “caged”?

Length:  500 words, typed or neatly handwritten

2. Jennings is a young boy who must persevere and overcome numerous barriers/obstacles.

a) Write four incidents where you believed Jennings remained stoic.
b) How did he deal with the situation?
c) What did he do to enable himself to keep going?
d) When was a time where you had to repeatedly persevere? What happened? Did you persevere alone? How did your family help?

Length:  500 words, typed or neatly handwritten

3. Jennings often retreats to the zoo. 

a) Why does he make the zoo his refuge?
b) What makes it safe?
c) What events forced him to resort to run to the zoo?
d) Give an example of a place where you have had to “retreat” to a safe haven.

Length:  500 words, typed or neatly handwritten

4. Jennings option of attending school waiver throughout his autobiography.

a) Why was he not forced to attend school?
b) How did he feel about education?
c) Was education a priority for his family? Why or why not?
d) Did society believe education was valid during this time period?
e) Specify how you have or haven’t prioritized your education. What instances happened to change your thinking?  How did you family view your validity of education?

Length:  500 words, typed or neatly handwritten

 

Side Dish:  Select any two of the following to complete:

1. Re-design the orphanages: The rules, the interior, privileges, education, admittance, lifers/part timers

2. Select two songs whose lyrics could correlate with how Jennings was abandoned, abused, mistreated and retreated into himself. Type or write the lyrics and tell why you selected those particular songs.

3. Compose a letter to one of Jennings’ brothers, mother, or Mrs. Carpenter discussing how they abandoned Jennings. Make sure there are no offensive words. 1.5 to 2 pages typed or handwritten

4. Write an editorial to the DHS (Dept. of Human Services) declaring the nun’s abuse of Jennings.

5. View the AEA 267 video: “The Brother’s Keeper” Compare and contrast the orphanages of AIDS victims to the orphanages in the book.

6. Create a timeline of events in the book, chapter by chapter.

7. Interview a person who was in an orphanage or foster care.  Write their story.

8. Doggie was important to Jennings’ survival. Invent a new item children in the orphanages or foster care could possess.

9. Other----approval needed by your teacher

 

Dessert Dish:  Select one of the following to complete:

1. Make a front page of an newspaper about the treatment of orphans during the story’s time period.

2. Write a letter from one of Jennings’ brothers to Jennings after they were older.

3. Draw four journal entries that Jennings, Stacy Sal, or his mother would have written.

4. Construct a model of an ideal orphanage.

5. Choose a chapter in the book to illustrate.

6. Visualize what was going on in Jennings’ head while he was being “caged.”  In a silhouette of a head, depict the emotions with words, drawings or sayings. Explain why you depicted it this way.

7. Make a Jeopardy game about the book.

8. View a television program where a person was abused, abandoned, neglected or caged. Tell the synopsis of the story. Give instances of similarities and differences to Jennings’ life.
 *This can be shown to the class with you being the discussion leader.

9. Invite one of the characters to dinner. Include your guest list, menu, and questions you would ask.  Tell what occurred at the dinner party.

10. Select one of the two picture books:  We Rode The Orphan Trains or Orphan Train Rider. Read the book, write a brief summary with how this connects with Jennings’ life. 


Main Dish Rubric

Name:

Date:

Project:

 

Exemplary

Quality

Satisfactory

Ideas/
Organization

Compelling; holds
readers attention;
engaging; strong
main ideas supported by details; specifically answering the essay question by stating four to five examples from the book; addresses all issues; well thought out; explicit examples of their own personal life

Shows some spark and interest; quality  main idea and details; answers most of the essay question in a fairly  competent manner; states three or more examples from the book; put  some thought into incorporating an example of writer's own personal life

Possesses main concept with few details; tried to answer the essay question but didn't give adequate thought or response; chose to only supply two or less specific examples from the book; did not give much effort to draw own personal life experience as an example

Points:

Points:

Points:

Voice

Attracts reader's attention; striking insight and
understanding of issues; precise vivid language; uses tone; indicates  engagement with the book; well crafted transitions; provocative conclusion


Voice comes and goes throughout paragraphs; states position on the issue without being very firm; some quality details; supplies some
Descriptive language; good conclusion

Some out of place information; needs re-ordering; some words seem chosen at random; voice is weak and stated position about issues is vague; conclusion is brief in order to be finished

Points:

Points:

Points:

Mechanics

Neatly typed or handwritten; no errors in punctuation,  capitalization and/or spelling; sentences are of varied length; appropriate and  correct use of parts of speech

Typed or handwritten; legible; one to two errors in punctuation,  capitalization and/or spelling; sentences are constructed well; some variation to sentence length

Typed or handwritten; three or more errors in punctuation,  capitalization and/or spelling; many run on sentences; some do  not possess correct language usage

 

Points:

Points:

Points:

Total Points


 

 

 


Comments:

 

 

 

 


Side Dish and Dessert Rubric

Name:

Date:

Project:

 

Expectations

Points

Points

Points

Content

Evidence of deeper understanding of Jennings’ life and/or related issues

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Addressed the key concepts as posed in the activity

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Process

Has a clear vision of final product

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Properly organized to complete project

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Managed class time wisely working on the project

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Acquired the needed knowledge base

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Product

Format

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Mechanics

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Organization and structure

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Creative

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Demonstrates knowledge

10  9  8

7  6  5

4  3  2

Total Points

 

 

 

 


Comments

 

 

 

 

 

                 

 

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